ADHD Is A Risk Factor For Type Two Diabetes And High Blood Pressure, As Well As Other Psychiatric Disorders

All Swedish residents have their health records tracked through unique personal identity numbers. That makes it possible to identify psychiatric and medical disorders with great accuracy across an entire population, in this case encompassing more than five and a half million adults aged 18 to 64. A subgroup of more than 1.6 million persons between the ages of 50 and 64 enabled a separate examination of disorders in older adults.

Slightly over one percent of the entire population (about 61,000) were diagnosed with ADHD at some point as an adult. Individuals with ADHD were nine times as likely to suffer from depression as were adults not diagnosed with ADHD. They were also more than nine times as likely to suffer from anxiety or a substance use disorder, and twenty times as likely to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder.  These findings are very consistent with reports from clinical samples in the USA and Europe.

Adults with ADHD also had elevated levels of metabolic disorders, being almost twice as likely to have high blood pressure, and more than twice as likely to have type 2 diabetes. Persons with ADHD but without psychiatric comorbidities were also almost twice as likely to have high blood pressure, and more than twice as likely to have type 2 diabetes.

Similar patterns were found in men and women with ADHD, although comorbid depression, bipolar disorder, and anxiety were moderately more prevalent in females than in males, whereas substance use disorder, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were more prevalent in males than in females.

ADHD was less than a third as prevalent in the over-50 population as in the general adult population. Nevertheless, individuals in this older group with ADHD were twelve times as likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, or substance use disorders, and more than 23 times as likely to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder as their non-ADHD peers. They were also 63% more likely to have high blood pressure, and 72% more likely to have type 2 diabetes.

The authors noted, “Although the mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood, we know from both epidemiologic and molecular genetic studies that a shared genetic predisposition might account for the co­existence of two or more psychiatric conditions. In addition, individuals with ADHD may experience increased difficulties as the demands of life increase, which may contribute to the development of depression and anxiety.” As for associations with hypertension and type 2 diabetes, these “might reflect health ­risk behaviors among adult patients with comorbid ADHD in addition to a shared biological substrate. As others have noted, inattention, disinhibition, and disorganization associated with ADHD could make it difficult for patients to adhere to treatment regimens for metabolic disorders.” They concluded that “Clinicians should remain vigilant for a wide range of psychiatric and metabolic problems in ADHD affected adults of all ages and both sexes.”

Stephen Faraone is distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience and Physiology at SUNY Upstate Medical University and is working on the H2020-funded project CoCA. 

REFERENCES

Qi Chen, Catharina A. Hartman, Jan Haavik, Jaanus Harro, Kari Klungsøyr, Tor­Arne Hegvik, Rob Wanders, Cæcilie Ottosen, Søren Dalsgaard, Stephen V. Faraone, Henrik Larsson, “Common psychiatric and metabolic comorbidity of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A population-based cross-sectional study,” PLoS ONE (2018), 13(9): e0204516. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0204516.

Living day-to-day with ADHD and experience of the CoCA clinical trial

Below is a recent interview from a patient who took part in the PROUD study in London  I would like to thank him for taking the time to answer my questions, his articulate descriptions provide a fascinating insight into what it is like to live with ADHD on a daily basis and his reflections on the PROUD clinical trial, provide us, as researchers, a valuable insight into what it is like to participate from the perspective of a patient.

  1. What is it like to live with ADHD?

Please describe your main symptoms. Have your symptoms changed since childhood vs. adulthood?

I find myself easily distracted. It is very difficult for me to carry out long tasks that require a lot of attention or very tedious tasks. I have racing thoughts going through my head 24/7 and it is very difficult for me to shut them off and focus on what I am doing. I also find myself experiencing mood swings very often. I have multiple highs and lows throughout the day and it is very difficult for me to maintain a stable mood. Also, when I read it is very difficult for me to retain the information and remember what I have just read. I also have trouble trying to organize my thoughts and speak in fluent sentences because my mind is thinking about so many things and I just want to get all of them out.

I would say my symptoms have gotten worse as I transition into adulthood, but it could be because I am more aware of what is going on and the science behind it. I always had anxiety when I was a kid but never really depression. I notice that as I get older I find I get down into slumps and feel really unmotivated. That is the main difference from my childhood and adulthood experiences.

When were you diagnosed with ADHD? By whom? How did you feel about getting the diagnosis?

I was diagnosed when I was roughly 12 years old. I went to see a Doctor to get tested because my reading comprehension was very low and my test taking ability was terrible as well. They discovered that I had ADHD as well as Performance Anxiety.

As a kid, you never want to be told that there is something wrong with you, but it was good to know why I was having the thoughts I had and what exactly was going on. This led me to do extensive research on these mental illnesses and get a better understanding of what was going on and how to better handle my symptoms.

How have you been treated (medication/ psychotherapy)? What are the effects?

I was treated for my anxiety with Anti-depressants as a kid but came off of them due to them making me emotionally numb. I was never treated for my ADHD as a kid because the doctors thought that Anxiety was the main culprit of my problems, but I have actually discovered that ADHD is the main issue.

I did have a psychiatrist for a while as a kid, but I can’t remember much from the sessions and I don’t think they were very helpful. I did do CBT towards the end of 2017 and that did prove to be quite helpful. I just recently decided to get treated for my ADHD with medication just after I finished the Trial at Kings College because I felt that my symptoms were really beginning to affect my life. So I am currently on 40 mg Elvanse and I am on the waiting list for CBT to try and give psychotherapy another shot.

How does ADHD influence your life? (Work, friends/partnership, hobbies etc.)

I am an Actor, so remembering lines and understanding things thoroughly is absolutely crucial! My ADHD comes in the way a bit because sometimes I zone out and don’t completely listen to instructions or other actors. Also, reading scripts can be a bit difficult in trying to retain the information and focus on what I am reading.

I find that it hinders my relationships because I am a bit all over the place sometimes and do not give my friends or family the time or attention they deserve. I have also found that my ADHD causes regular mood swings so sometimes I am feeling depressed and do not feel like doing anything. This affects my work and relationships as well as my hobbies.

Do your friends/ colleagues know about your illness?

Yes, they do. I find it extremely important that everyone understands why I may act strange sometimes and also, they will understand me better. It is not something that I am ashamed of. It is just the way my brain works.

What is the worst thing about having ADHD?

The biggest issues are not being able to focus or getting easily distracted. Another of the big issues I have is the depression side of things. It also drains all of my energy and I end up not feeling like doing anything.

Do you think ADHD has any positive influences in your life?

One of the big benefits of having ADHD is always planning everything! I have to always be very prepared, but it is also a bad thing because it causes me anxiety sometimes. But then again, I don’t believe I would be the same person I am now if I didn’t have these issues.

  1. Study and Intervention

How did you learn about the study?

I believe I learned about the study from the Clinicaltrials.org website.

What motivated you to participate?

I absolutely love psychology and I am always interested in learning about the things that affect me personally. I am always doing research on mental health because it allows me to get a better understanding of what is happening on a more scientific level. It gives me more insight and allows me to better deal with my symptoms.

What were your expectations about the study before you started?

I expected to get a better understanding of ADHD and even finding a new strategy on coping with my symptoms.

Which intervention did you participate in, when?

Exercise intervention.

What did you like about the intervention? What did you dislike?

I liked the fact that it kept me busy and it also forced me to be proactive and accountable because I couldn’t lose the phone or the wrist band tracker. It made me work on that aspect of my ADHD because I do tend to forget to do things and I am always losing things. I also found that my depression is onset when I am not doing anything so having to be accountable for this exercise and doing what I was supposed to do kept my mind busy.

The only thing I didn’t like was the wrist band and having the wear it all the time because it is quite unattractive, and I do travel a lot so having to keep it while traveling it abroad and charging everything was just a bit overwhelming.

Was the intervention helpful? (Any effects on ADHD core symptoms, mood, sleep, weight, fitness etc.?)  

I am already a very active person, so it didn’t really change anything as far as fitness goes. It helped my sleep patterns because I was more aware of how much I was sleeping because I had to write it down. I feel like it helped my mood a bit because I was focused on phone ringing and answering the questions, so my mind was wandering off and causing me depression.

Was it difficult/easy to use the App?

The app was extremely easy to use but it was a bit tedious when it would go off every hour or so and was a bit annoying when I was busy or working. Not to mention that I couldn’t cover up the tracker with a sleeve or a jacket because of the light sensor.

Would you recommend other people with ADHD to participate in the study? Why?

Yes I would because I feel like it gives people a better understanding of their mental health and gives them some helpful things that they can take away from the study to implement into their life. Having a mental illness does not mean you are less of a person or less capable, but it is just important to understand what is going on. If you understand what is causing the symptoms, then it is easier to find ways to overcome these issues.

 Any suggestions/ways that the researchers could improve the experience for people in this study?

I would recommend updating the technology and having a more advanced wrist band sensor that looks more like a watch like apple watches or fitbits. It is an amazing study and I am very happy with how it was conducted. I wish I could offer more ways that you could improve the study, but my experience has been extremely satisfying.

Adam Pawley is a clinical neuroscientist at King’s College London. He is running the CoCA PROUD trial in London.

Mini-documentary: “Shine a light – understanding ADHD”

On the last day of the international ADHD Awareness Month, we are releasing a mini-documentary about ADHD. The hope is that this video will help young people and adults diagnosed with ADHD, or who suspect they have ADHD, as well as their family and friends, to understand the condition better.

“I feel like a universe, stuffed within a shoebox” – this is how Bryn Travers describes what it’s like to have Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In this short film we have asked people with ADHD and their relatives about living with ADHD: what are the challenges and what are the things they like about ADHD? We have also asked clinicians and researchers working with ADHD to explain more about the origins of the disorder, what they have learnt from their experience working with patients, but also what are the main questions that research is trying to answer about ADHD.

Many children, adolescents and adults suffer from ADHD. ADHD is a complex disorder that affects people differently. Generally people experience problems in daily life, especially with respect to controlling attention, impulses and emotions. At the same time, people with ADHD enjoy their creativity and positive energy. Medication is effective for many people with ADHD, but not for all. That is why many people are interested in other types of (additional) treatment, such as meditation or diets. These types of treatment should therefore be better investigated. Knowing more about ADHD and spreading awareness will help people to understand what causes their behaviour. This will reduce stigma and (self)blame.

The video features four of the most well-known researchers in the field of ADHD: dr. Eric Taylor is emeritus professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at King’s College London, dr. Philip Asherson is professor of Molecular Psychiatry at King’s College London, dr. Barbara Franke is professor of Molecular Psychiatry at Radboud university medical center Nijmegen (The Netherlands), and dr. Corina Greven is psychologist and behavioural geneticist at Radboud university medical center Nijmegen. Next to these scientists and psychiatrists, we see three people with ADHD (Bryn Travers, Evie Travers and Aziz), Andrea Bilbow, president of patient organisation ‘ADHD Europe’ and mother of two children with ADHD, and dr. Kai Syng Tan, researcher and artist at King’s College London, who also has an ADHD diagnosis.

This film was created through the MiND research consortium, in collaboration with the consortia Aggressotype, CoCA and Eat2beNICE. These consortia are all funded by the European Commission through the FP-7 and horizon2020 programs. Young researchers dr. Nicoletta Adamo and Laura Ghirardi are the brains behind this film, with the help of the MiND training program and 4QuarterFilms.

Do you want to help us spreading awareness about ADHD? Then share this video with everyone you know! The video also contains subtitles in English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Italian, Swedish and Hungarian (and more languages may follow).

You can watch the video here:

ADHD Awareness month: Interview with a Participant

This month is the ADHD awareness month and we wanted to share with you an interview with one of the PROUD participants (CoCA project, Comorbid Conditions of ADHD).

The participant is a 21-year old male college student who is originally from Peru but has been living in Barcelona for a few years. He participated and did the exercise intervention of the PROUD Study.

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  1. What is it like to live with ADHD?

Please describe your main symptoms. Have your symptoms changed since childhood vs. adulthood?

When I was an adolescent, my main symptoms were low concentration capacity and hyperactivity (I could not sit for a long time). I was always bored and doing too many things at the same time. I was very impulsive as well and I had problems with my family and friends because I meddled in their activities and conversations.

Now I am 21 years old and I notice I have less hyperactivity and I can control more my impulsivity. On the other hand, my concentration is still bad and I need external help in order to improve it (pharmacology).

When were you diagnosed with ADHD? By whom? How did you feel about getting the diagnosis?

When I was 11 years old, I had very many academic difficulties and the school Psychologist noticed some ADHD symptoms in me. So, she sent me to a specialized psychology center and I was diagnosed with ADHD. This was in Perú, my country, but here in Spain I repeated some tests and I was diagnosed again and the psychologist confirmed the diagnosis.

At that time, I felt like the most weird kid in my class because I had to spend  some hours with the School psychologist and do some separate activities from the other children. My classmates asked me all the time where I was going and this bothered me.

How have you been treated (medication/ psychotherapy)? What are the effects?

When I was in Perú, I remember my parents gave me a syrup (I don’t remember the name) and my teachers were worried because they said I didn’t move from my chair in all day long, like I was sedated. My parents worried as well, and stopped giving it to me.

Then when I was older, in Spain, my brother told me I was very disorganized and I didn’t use the time well (referring to my studies). So I went to a different doctor and I started with ADHD medication.

The main effects I notice are irritability, low mood, less spontaneity and the fact that I prefer to be alone because I have a lot of concentration.

How does ADHD influence your life? (Work, friends/partnership, hobbies etc.)

When I was kid it was more difficult because I wanted to be like the other kids and be treated like a “normal” kid at school. I am competitive and I wanted to achieve the same goals as the other kids.

Regarding the friendships, it depends because there are times I want to be with friends and there are times I prefer to be alone. Some friends have been angry with me because I didn’t pay attention to them for a long time.

Do your friends/ colleagues know about your illness?

I mentioned the ADHD to a few friends and classmates because they didn’t understand some things about my behavior, my mood changes, etc. Sometimes I think people think I am dumb or something when I explain to them about the ADHD. That’s because it is difficult to me to talk about my disease.

What is the worst thing about having ADHD?

The worst thing about having ADHD is that people have a lot of prejudices about it and have a lot of incorrect thoughts about what it means. Some people told me that I will become a drug addict because I was taking pills for ADHD, they always think I don’t need the pharmacology. People usually treat me like a lazy person but I am not lazy, I just have low concentration capacity.

Sometimes, I believe that I won’t be able to achieve my objectives, I feel like I am not good for anything, and this is the saddest part about ADHD for me.

Do you think ADHD has any positive influences in your life?

I think so. I have had to be creative and follow my own strategies. I have been alone (without any friends) sometimes but this has made me stronger. And the most important thing, I know I have difficulties because of ADHD but I have learned to be a tenacious person and never give up.

  1. Study and Intervention

How did you learn about the study?

My psychiatrist from Vall d’Hebron told me about the study.

What motivated you to participate?

What motivated me the most is that if I participate in this kind of study, it could help the professionals to investigate and improve the ADHD treatments.

What were your expectations about the study before you started?

I wanted to learn more about this illness so I thought this study could help me too.

What intervention did you participate in? When?

I did the Exercise condition. I started 5 months ago more or less.

What did you like about the intervention? What did you dislike about the intervention?

I really liked the fact that I had a continuous monitoring and regular visits. Furthermore, the psychologist J.P. helped me a lot to understand all the devices I had to use and was very patient with me. She also helped me with more ADHD issues and gave me good advice.

On the other hand, what I didn’t like was the sensor I had to wear all the time because it was very big and uncomfortable.

Was the intervention helpful? (Any effects on ADHD core symptoms, mood, sleep, weight, fitness etc.?)  

I think the intervention was helpful for improving my physical condition and I was more tired so it helped me to sleep better. I also understood that my emotions and mood are important and that I have to take care of my mental health.

Was it difficult/easy to use the App?

It was easy to use the App but sometimes I had doubts about the sensor, because I didn’t know if it was synchronized with the smartphone or not.

Would you recommend other people with ADHD to participate in the study? Why?

Yes, I would recommend it, because it is important to investigate and you can learn more about the symptoms and adverse events of ADHD.

 Any suggestions/ways that the researchers could improve the experience for people in this study?

I would just change the sensor or the fact that you have to wear it all the time. I was embarrassed and it was very big.

 

 

Are you interested in participating, or do you want more information?

The trial will be continued until 2020. All outpatients with ADHD aged 14 to 45 years old living in and around Barcelona, Frankfurt, London or Nijmegen are invited to participate in the trial.

Contact:

Barcelona: judit.palacio@vhir.org

Frankfurt: Proud-Studie@kgu.de

London: adam.1.pawley@kcl.ac.uk

Nijmegen: proud@karakter.com

More information about the trial can be found on the CoCA website: http://coca-project.eu/coca-phase-iia-trial/study/

10 weeks of physical exercise or light therapy: what’s it like to participate in our clinical trial?

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In 2017, under the umbrella of an EU-funded CoCA project (Comorbid Conditions of ADHD), we started a pilot clinical trial to test the potential of bright light therapy and physical exercise to improve and prevent depression and obesity in adolescents and young adults with ADHD. Our aim is to provide non-pharmacological interventions that could easily be done at home and integrated into daily routines.

The study (named PROUD) is simultaneously going on in Frankfurt, Barcelona, London and Nijmegen. 60 people have already participated across these different locations. As the study is still ongoing (we’re about half way), we don’t have the results yet. However, we have interviewed some people who have taken part so far about their experiences with the interventions and their experience of living with ADHD. Their enlightening reports also give us the great opportunity to learn more how it feels for adolescents and young adults to live with ADHD – a disorder that is still seen as predominantly childhood condition. These interviews will be posted on this blog in the following months, but the first one you can already read here. We would like to extend our gratitude to our study participants, not only for participating but also for giving up their time to answer our questions.

Awareness about ADHD

This month – which is the ADHD awareness month -, we interviewed a 21-year old male college student who is originally from Peru but has been living in Barcelona for a few years who participated in the exercise intervention. You can read the interview here. During this interview he said that “The worst thing about having ADHD is that people have a lot of prejudices about it and have a lot of incorrect thoughts about what it means.” These real-life patient highlighted issues emphasize the importance of raising public awareness of ADHD.

 About the clinical study

Stimulant medications are the mainstay treatment for the typical symptoms of ADHD1. However, many patients (about 85% of adults with ADHD)) also suffer from psychiatric and somatic comorbidities – including mood disorders2 and obesity3. The risk for these co-morbid conditions is especially high for patients during adolescence and young adulthood4. Bright light therapy (BLT) is an established therapy for major depression and exercise prevents and reduces obesity and improves depressive symptoms, however it is not yet known whether these therapies are effective in adolescents and adults with ADHD. To support patients during the 10 weeks of intervention, a mobile technology was developed specifically for this trial by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Patients receive app-based instructions and feedback via a smartphone and they wear a sensor that records their physical activity and light exposure throughout the study. We earlier wrote about this study in two Blogs. CoCA-PROUD trial ready to roll How bright light and physical exercise might help ADHD patients

Are you interested in participating, or do you want more information?

The trial will be continued until 2020. All outpatients with ADHD aged 14 to 45 years old living in and around Barcelona, Frankfurt, London or Nijmegen are invited to participate in the trial.

Contact:

Barcelona: judit.palacio@vhir.org

Frankfurt: Proud-Studie@kgu.de

London: adam.1.pawley@kcl.ac.uk

Nijmegen: proud@karakter.com

More information about the trial can be found on the CoCA website: http://coca-project.eu/coca-phase-iia-trial/study/

References    

1Cortese S, Adamo N, Del Giovane C, Mohr-Jensen C, Hayes AJ, Carucci S, et al. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, adolescents, and adults: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Lancet Psychiatry. 2018;5(9):727-738.

2Jacob CP, Romanos J, Dempfle A, Heine M, Windemuth-Kieselbach C, Kruse A, et al. Co-morbidity of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with focus on personality traits and related disorders in a tertiary referral center. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2007;257:309–17.

3 Cortese S, Moreira-Maia CR, St Fleur D, Morcillo-Penalver C, Rohde LA, Faraone SV. Association between ADHD and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2016;173:34–43.

4Meinzer MC, Lewinsohn PM, Pettit JW, Seeley JR, Gau JM, Chronis-Tuscano A, et al. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adolescence predicts onset of major depressive disorder through early adulthood. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30:546–53.

This post was written by Jutta Mayer and Adam Pawley. Jutta Mayer is a psychologist and psychotherapist at the University Hospital Frankfurt. She is the clinical project manager of the PROUD study which is part of the CoCA project (www.coca-project.eu). Adam Pawley is a clinical neuroscientist at King’s College London. He is conducting the PROUD trial in London.

It’s ADHD awareness month!

ADHDAwarenessMonth_Color_Large-5a76306eae9ab80036d0171c

October is the international ADHD awareness month. This initiative of the European ADHD patient organisations aims to raise awareness about ADHD, and funding for more research to understand ADHD. Throughout Europe many events will be organised this month to inform people about ADHD. Because although most people have heard about ADHD, there are still a lot of misconceptions and misunderstandings of what ADHD really is.

This year’s theme of the ADHD awareness month is ADHD and employment. As ADHD is increasingly being recognised as persisting into adulthood, ADHD on the work floor is something to take into account as well. The bad news is that unemployment rates are higher for people with ADHD [1] as well as the number of absence days and turnover rates [2]. But the good news is that ADHD is often associated with entrepreneurship. For instance, a large registry-based study showed that a high number of hyperactive symptoms is related to a high chance of being self-employed [3].

According to Andrea Bilbow, president of the European organisation ADHD Europe, “it should be more widely known that people with ADHD have great skills to offer to employers. It is important for employers to understand that ADHD is a disability, and that people with ADHD can be a great asset if you find their strengths. Employers should be aware that if you help employees with ADHD to scaffold the things they’re less good at, then they can excel at the things they are good at. For instance, in general people with ADHD are very good in IT, in problem solving, and in fixing things. They are often less good at paper work and processing a lot of information. So one piece of advice is to not overload them with too many instructions. Instead, if you give them one task at a time and they will do task incredibly well.” So are you an ADHD-friendly employer? We previously posted a blog on this.

The ADHD researchers that are affiliated with the MiND the gap-blog are also contributing to ADHD awareness month. We will be posting several blogs this month about our ongoing studies and recent publications on ADHD and comorbid disorders (i.e. from the CoCA project). Furthermore, at several European sites researchers are organising events to raise awareness about ADHD. In Nijmegen, The Netherlands, for instance you can come to the university’s open day on October 6 and draw your own superhero with ADHD (you can even win a prize!). Also check out the website of the ADHD patient organisation in your country or city to find out more about what’s happening.

Last, but definitely not least, we will soon be releasing a short documentary about ADHD that was created through the MiND-project, in collaboration with the other EU-funded projects and research consotira (Aggressotype, CoCA and Eat2BeNICE, IMpACT). So keep following this blog for updates, and spread the word about ADHD awareness!

For more information about ADHD awareness month, visit the website of ADHD Europe: https://www.adhdeurope.eu/

 

Jeanette Mostert is dissemination manager for the projects CoCA and New Brain Nutrition (Eat2BeNice).

 Further reading

[1] Kuriyan, A.B., Pelham, W.E., Molina, B.S.G. et al. (2013) Young Adult Educational and Vocational Outcomes of Children Diagnosed with ADHD. J Abnorm Child Psychol, 41: 27-41. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-012-9658-z

[2] Kleinman, N.L., Durkin, M., Melkonian, A., Markosyan, K. (2009) Incremental Employee Health Benefit Costs, Absence Days, and Turnover Among Employees With ADHD and Among Employees With Children With ADHD. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 51: 1247-1255 doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181bca68c

[3] Verheul, I., Rietdijk, W., Block, J. et al. (2016) The association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD) symptoms and self-employment. Eur J Epidemiol, 31: 793. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-016-0159-1

A Meeting of MiNDs

On Friday 1st June the MiND EU project hosted a successful patient information evening in collaboration with ADHD-Europe, the ADANA Foundation and Dr Toni Ramos-Quiroga at Vall d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona. Anyone with an interest in research into Autism and ADHD were warmly invited to view posters and presentations on the latest developments from the MiND project and our collaborators.

Patient evening blog 1

The world of science is often seen as having a mind of its own, which does not often engage with the community. However, the MiND project would like to change this perception! We hosted a patient information evening to discuss our work on ASD and ADHD with the public, with the aim to share our knowledge of these disorders and to promote inquisitive minds.

The presentations were opened by Dr. Toni Ramos-Quiroga and Andrea Bilbow OBE, President of ADHD Europe. Although our speakers varied in their backgrounds, they are all active in genetics and psychiatric research, with a passion to improve our understanding of ADHD and ASD.

Professor Bru Cormand, who leads a Neurogenetics Research Group at the University of Barcelona, talked about the genetics of Autism and ADHD and the role of the environment in the development of these disorders. Professor Cormand explained that we share more than 99% of our genome with any other human being, so it is the remaining 1% which makes the differences among individuals, both in health and disease. Biomedical researchers look into this fraction of the genome to find the causes of many diseases. These genes are instructions for producing proteins, some of which are involved in the communication process between neurons in our brain. It is important that we study these genes because the connectivity between neurons is crucial. When this mechanism is impaired, due to alterations in certain genes, the result is often a  psychiatric condition like ADHD or ASD.

Professor Cormand also explained how we can use family studies to understand ASD and ADHD. From this type of research we now know that genetic factors play a very important role both in ADHD and in ASD, with a share of more than 70%. The rest possibly corresponds to environmental risk factors, such as prenatal or birth complications. Other external factors, like vaccines, do not contribute to these disorders. To date, we have been able to identify several contributor genes for both ASD and ADHD. Professor Cormand eloquently described our genome as a ‘crystal ball’ “if correctly asked, it can provide information about things that will take place in the future. Our health and our disease is, to a great extent, written in the genes… but they can also help us to find ways for improvement”.

Further research in this area will be highly beneficial for patients in the future for several reasons:

  1. They provide basic knowledge on the causes of the disorders, which can be useful in diagnosis or even for prognosis (anticipation of future complications).
  2. It points at potential therapeutic targets, i.e. proteins that can be targeted with drugs.
  3. The genetic profile of an individual can predict response to a treatment or side effects, if any.

However, we still need some time to complete the full genetic landscape before we fully understand these disorders!

Dr Alejandro Arias-Vasquez, an associate professor in genetic epidemiology informed attendees of an exciting, up and coming area of research: the microbiome and its role in ADHD. Through research we have learned which are “good” and “bad” foods that influence the risk of being obese, having diabetes, or suffering from cardiovascular disease.  However, we are also beginning to learn that what people eat can also affect the way the brain works, although these mechanisms are currently unclear.

So far research has shown that there is convincing evidence of a sizeable impact – both harmful and protective – of nutrition components on behaviors such as impulsivity and compulsivity. Currently, the experts do not know how big the impact (effect size) of these non-pharmacological interventions is, which raises questions such as:

  • Can people improve our overall brain functioning by improving diet and lifestyle?
  • Can we replace medication used for treating psychiatric disease with specific diets?
  • Shall we complement pharmacological treatment with specific diets to improve behavior?

Dr Arias-Vasquez hopes to answer these questions by leading a new research consortium called Eat2beNICE. This project will study different diets and nutritional supplements in children and adults. It is anticipated that this research will create new evidence-based approaches for making recommendations about nutrition and its links to changing behavior. This could mean that specific dietary changes could be one or part of the treatment options for ASD and ADHD in the future.

Patient evening blog 2

Dr Laura Gisbert explained her research as a psychiatrist at Vall d’Hebron. Currently, Dr Gisbert is involved with many research projects (that take place in her clinic). In particular, there are two clinical trials testing out medications for ASD and ADHD: Vasopressin for adults with ASD and Guanfacine for children with ADHD. Dr Gisbert explained that two main approaches are used to develop pharmacological agents for ASD. One is re-purposing treatments from other psychiatric disorders that have symptoms in common with ASD. The second approach is to target the neurobiological processes underlying ASD. Although there have been studies of medications that reduce ASD symptoms, by targeting specific circuits in the brain, there is still a lack of clear evidence to recommend the routine use of any of these medications for the moment. Similarly in ADHD, more research is needed to find effective medications with fewer side effects. Not all patients can tolerate stimulant medications that are often prescribed for ADHD, and therefore alternatives need to be found. Furthermore, this medications that can simultaneously improve symptoms of frequently co-occuring disorders such as ASD, would also be advantageous to patients. It is hoped that the clinical trials taking place at Val d’Hebron will contribute to this work, in order to improve treatment strategies for patients with ASD and/or ADHD.

These presentations were highly engaging as demonstrated by our audiences need for a long Q&A session with our speakers on various topics from treatment strategies to genetics.

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Attendees were also highly interested in the poster presentations given by the MiND early stage researchers (Viola Palladino, Niall Mortimer, Anu Shivalikanjli, Joanna Szopinska-Tokov, Sara Boxhoorn and Francesca Waddington). These posters represented the diverse range of topics studied within the MiND project, which include the gut microbiome in ADHD, the genetics of ADHD, stem cell research, how we measure attention in ASD and ADHD and the relationship between these two disorders. These also proved to be very thought-provoking with many discussions between members of the public and our researchers.

The MiND project is proud that our event was so insightful and to have elicited such a great response!

If you would like to find out more about our research see
mind-project.eu
Eat2beNice

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